Picayune, MS (39466)

08:49 AM CDT die 26o May, anno 2018 (GMT -0500)
Plantation Oaks | | Change Station
Active Advisory: Hurricane Statement (), Flash Flood Watch Active Notice: Flash Flood Watch

Elev 82 ft 30.51 °N, 89.63 °W | Updated 34 seconds ago

Clear
Serena
76.1 °F
Feels Like 77 °F
N
2.7
Ventus Variabilis Ventus from Magis Aquilo quam Eurus
Gusts 4.3 mph

Hodie
High -- | Low -- °F
--% Chance of Precip.
Yesterday
High -- | Low -- °F
Precip. -- in
Pressio 29.91 in
Visibilitas 10.0 milia passuum
Clouds Serena
Index Caloris 77 °F
Frigus in quo Ros apparet 71 °F
Umor 85%
Rainfall 0.00 in
Snow Depth Not available.
5:58 AM 7:53 PM
Waxing Gibbous, 91% visible
METAR KASD 261253Z AUTO 01003KT 10SM CLR 24/22 A2991 RMK AO2 SLP128 T02390217
Pressio 29.91 in
Visibilitas 10.0 milia passuum
Clouds Serena
Index Caloris 77 °F
Frigus in quo Ros apparet 71 °F
Umor 85%
Rainfall 0.00 in
Snow Depth Not available.
5:58 AM 7:53 PM
Waxing Gibbous, 91% visible
METAR KASD 261253Z AUTO 01003KT 10SM CLR 24/22 A2991 RMK AO2 SLP128 T02390217

Get Your Daily Forecast Email!

Thanks for signing up!

Be on the lookout for a verification email in your inbox.

You'll start receiving severe weather alerts in your inbox..

×

10-Day Weather Forecast

Almanac

Astronomy

May. 26, 2018 Rise Set
Actual Time
Civil Twilight
Nautical Twilight
Astronomical Twilight
Moon
Length Of Visible Light
Length of Day
Tomorrow will be .
, % of the Moon is Illuminated

Today's Extremes

State Highs State Lows

Community

WunderPhotos

Category 6

Welcome to Category 6. This is the collective home for Weather Underground's featured writeups by Dr. Jeff Masters (right), Bob Henson (left), Chris Burt, and other regular contributors.

Nearby

Air Quality

  Air Quality AQ Index Pollutant
Not available.

Snow Depth

Station Depth Elevation

Earthquake Activity

City Distance Mag. Time & Date
Minimum magnitude displayed is 2.5.

Coastal Water Temperatures

Locus Calor

Stations

Nearby Weather Stations

Station Location Temp Frigus Venti Frigus in quo Ros apparet Umor Ventus Precip. Elev Renovata Type
                   

Watches & Warnings

Hurricane Statement
Issued: 4:39 AM CDT May. 26, 2018 – National Weather Service

This product covers southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi

**tropical storm and storm surge watches in effect for portions of
southeast Louisiana and coastal mississippi**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a storm surge watch and tropical storm watch are in effect for
      Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, lower Plaquemines, lower St.
      Bernard, Orleans, and upper St. Bernard
    - a tropical storm watch is in effect for Ascension, Livingston,
      lower Jefferson, southern Tangipahoa, St. Charles, St. James,
      St. John The Baptist, St. Tammany, upper Jefferson, and upper
      Plaquemines

* storm information:
    - about 750 miles south-southeast of New Orleans la or about 760
      miles south-southeast of Gulfport MS
    - 19.9n 85.6w
    - storm intensity 40 mph
    - movement north-northeast or 15 degrees at 7 mph

Situation overview
------------------

* overview... at 400 am CDT, sub-Tropical Storm Alberto was moving
north-northeast near 7 mph off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The
system is expected to continue moving north-northeast at a faster
speed later today, followed by a turn to the northwest on Sunday.
Tropical impacts should begin to be felt across southeast Louisiana
and southern Mississippi by late Sunday and Sunday night and persist
through Tuesday morning.

The primary impact will be heavy rainfall that could produce inland
flooding. Secondary impacts will be storm surge, tornadoes, and
tropical storm force winds.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
prepare for dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant
impacts across portions of the Mississippi coast and extreme
southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts include:
    - moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and
      rescues.
    - Rivers and tributaries may quickly become swollen with swifter
      currents and overspill their banks in a few places, especially
      in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and
      ditches overflow.
    - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations.
      Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid
      inundation at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage
      areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as
      storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions
      become hazardous. Some Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. Potential impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages.

* Surge:
prepare for life-threatening surge having possible significant
impacts across the immediate coast of Mississippi and also
for east facing shores outside of the hurricane protection system
in far southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by
      waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast.
    - Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become
      weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low
      spots.
    - Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and
      numerous rip currents.
    - Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
      Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in
      unprotected anchorages.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in New Orleans la around 8 am CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


439 am CDT Sat may 26 2018

This product covers southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi

**tropical storm and storm surge watches in effect for portions of
southeast Louisiana and coastal mississippi**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a storm surge watch and tropical storm watch are in effect for
      Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, lower Plaquemines, lower St.
      Bernard, Orleans, and upper St. Bernard
    - a tropical storm watch is in effect for Ascension, Livingston,
      lower Jefferson, southern Tangipahoa, St. Charles, St. James,
      St. John The Baptist, St. Tammany, upper Jefferson, and upper
      Plaquemines

* storm information:
    - about 750 miles south-southeast of New Orleans la or about 760
      miles south-southeast of Gulfport MS
    - 19.9n 85.6w
    - storm intensity 40 mph
    - movement north-northeast or 15 degrees at 7 mph

Situation overview
------------------

* overview... at 400 am CDT, sub-Tropical Storm Alberto was moving
north-northeast near 7 mph off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The
system is expected to continue moving north-northeast at a faster
speed later today, followed by a turn to the northwest on Sunday.
Tropical impacts should begin to be felt across southeast Louisiana
and southern Mississippi by late Sunday and Sunday night and persist
through Tuesday morning.

The primary impact will be heavy rainfall that could produce inland
flooding. Secondary impacts will be storm surge, tornadoes, and
tropical storm force winds.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
prepare for dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant
impacts across portions of the Mississippi coast and extreme
southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts include:
    - moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and
      rescues.
    - Rivers and tributaries may quickly become swollen with swifter
      currents and overspill their banks in a few places, especially
      in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and
      ditches overflow.
    - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations.
      Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid
      inundation at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage
      areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as
      storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions
      become hazardous. Some Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. Potential impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages.

* Surge:
prepare for life-threatening surge having possible significant
impacts across the immediate coast of Mississippi and also
for east facing shores outside of the hurricane protection system
in far southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by
      waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast.
    - Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become
      weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low
      spots.
    - Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and
      numerous rip currents.
    - Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
      Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in
      unprotected anchorages.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in New Orleans la around 8 am CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.



439 am CDT Sat may 26 2018

This product covers southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi

**tropical storm and storm surge watches in effect for portions of
southeast Louisiana and coastal mississippi**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a storm surge watch and tropical storm watch are in effect for
      Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, lower Plaquemines, lower St.
      Bernard, Orleans, and upper St. Bernard
    - a tropical storm watch is in effect for Ascension, Livingston,
      lower Jefferson, southern Tangipahoa, St. Charles, St. James,
      St. John The Baptist, St. Tammany, upper Jefferson, and upper
      Plaquemines

* storm information:
    - about 750 miles south-southeast of New Orleans la or about 760
      miles south-southeast of Gulfport MS
    - 19.9n 85.6w
    - storm intensity 40 mph
    - movement north-northeast or 15 degrees at 7 mph

Situation overview
------------------

* overview... at 400 am CDT, sub-Tropical Storm Alberto was moving
north-northeast near 7 mph off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The
system is expected to continue moving north-northeast at a faster
speed later today, followed by a turn to the northwest on Sunday.
Tropical impacts should begin to be felt across southeast Louisiana
and southern Mississippi by late Sunday and Sunday night and persist
through Tuesday morning.

The primary impact will be heavy rainfall that could produce inland
flooding. Secondary impacts will be storm surge, tornadoes, and
tropical storm force winds.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
prepare for dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant
impacts across portions of the Mississippi coast and extreme
southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts include:
    - moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and
      rescues.
    - Rivers and tributaries may quickly become swollen with swifter
      currents and overspill their banks in a few places, especially
      in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and
      ditches overflow.
    - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations.
      Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid
      inundation at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage
      areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as
      storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions
      become hazardous. Some Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. Potential impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages.

* Surge:
prepare for life-threatening surge having possible significant
impacts across the immediate coast of Mississippi and also
for east facing shores outside of the hurricane protection system
in far southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by
      waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast.
    - Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become
      weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low
      spots.
    - Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and
      numerous rip currents.
    - Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
      Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in
      unprotected anchorages.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in New Orleans la around 8 am CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


439 am CDT Sat may 26 2018

This product covers southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi

**tropical storm and storm surge watches in effect for portions of
southeast Louisiana and coastal mississippi**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a storm surge watch and tropical storm watch are in effect for
      Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, lower Plaquemines, lower St.
      Bernard, Orleans, and upper St. Bernard
    - a tropical storm watch is in effect for Ascension, Livingston,
      lower Jefferson, southern Tangipahoa, St. Charles, St. James,
      St. John The Baptist, St. Tammany, upper Jefferson, and upper
      Plaquemines

* storm information:
    - about 750 miles south-southeast of New Orleans la or about 760
      miles south-southeast of Gulfport MS
    - 19.9n 85.6w
    - storm intensity 40 mph
    - movement north-northeast or 15 degrees at 7 mph

Situation overview
------------------

* overview... at 400 am CDT, sub-Tropical Storm Alberto was moving
north-northeast near 7 mph off the coast of the Yucatan Peninsula. The
system is expected to continue moving north-northeast at a faster
speed later today, followed by a turn to the northwest on Sunday.
Tropical impacts should begin to be felt across southeast Louisiana
and southern Mississippi by late Sunday and Sunday night and persist
through Tuesday morning.

The primary impact will be heavy rainfall that could produce inland
flooding. Secondary impacts will be storm surge, tornadoes, and
tropical storm force winds.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
prepare for dangerous rainfall flooding having possible significant
impacts across portions of the Mississippi coast and extreme
southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts include:
    - moderate rainfall flooding may prompt several evacuations and
      rescues.
    - Rivers and tributaries may quickly become swollen with swifter
      currents and overspill their banks in a few places, especially
      in usually vulnerable spots. Small streams, creeks, canals, and
      ditches overflow.
    - Flood waters can enter some structures or weaken foundations.
      Several places may experience expanded areas of rapid
      inundation at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage
      areas. Some streets and parking lots take on moving water as
      storm drains and retention ponds overflow. Driving conditions
      become hazardous. Some Road and bridge closures.

* Wind:
prepare for hazardous wind having possible limited impacts across
southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. Potential impacts include:
    - damage to porches, awnings, carports, sheds, and unanchored
      Mobile homes. Unsecured lightweight objects blown about.
    - Many large tree limbs broken off. A few trees snapped or
      uprooted, but with greater numbers in places where trees are
      shallow rooted. Some fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - A few roads impassable from debris, particularly within urban
      or heavily wooded places. Hazardous driving conditions on
      bridges and other elevated roadways.
    - Scattered power and communications outages.

* Surge:
prepare for life-threatening surge having possible significant
impacts across the immediate coast of Mississippi and also
for east facing shores outside of the hurricane protection system
in far southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by
      waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast.
    - Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become
      weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low
      spots.
    - Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and
      numerous rip currents.
    - Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
      Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in
      unprotected anchorages.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in New Orleans la around 8 am CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.



111 am CDT Sat may 26 2018

This product covers southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi

**tropical storm and storm surge watches in effect for portions of
southeast Louisiana and coastal mississippi**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a storm surge watch and tropical storm watch are in effect for
      Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, lower Plaquemines, lower St.
      Bernard, Orleans, and upper St. Bernard
    - a tropical storm watch is in effect for Ascension, Livingston,
      lower Jefferson, southern Tangipahoa, St. Charles, St. James,
      St. John The Baptist, St. Tammany, upper Jefferson, and upper
      Plaquemines

* storm information:
    - about 800 miles south-southeast of New Orleans la or about 810
      miles south-southeast of Gulfport MS
    - 19.1n 85.7w
    - storm intensity 40 mph
    - movement east or 90 degrees at 4 mph

Situation overview
------------------

* overview... at 100 am CDT, sub-Tropical Storm Alberto was located
over the northwestern Caribbean Sea and was moving slowly east
near 4 mph. The system is expected to begin moving north later
today with a faster motion to the north expected Saturday night
and Sunday. Tropical impacts should begin to be felt across
southeast Louisiana and southern Mississippi by late
Sunday and Sunday night and persist through Tuesday morning. The
primary impact will be heavy rainfall that could produce inland
flooding. Secondary impacts will be storm surge, tornadoes, and
tropical storm force winds.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across portions of the Mississippi coast and
extreme southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. Potential
impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding may prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries may quickly rise with swifter currents.
      Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become swollen
      and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually
      vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water
      occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage
      areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become
      near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief Road and bridge
      closures.

* Wind:
prepare for dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across
extreme southeast Louisiana and coastal Mississippi. Potential impacts
include:
    - some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage
      to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings
      experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile
      homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight
      objects become dangerous projectiles.
    - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater
      numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several
      fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban
      or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access
      routes impassable.
    - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent
      in areas with above ground lines.

* Surge:
prepare for life-threatening surge having possible significant
impacts across the immediate coast of Mississippi and also
for east facing shores outside of the hurricane protection system
in far southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by
      waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast.
    - Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become
      weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low
      spots.
    - Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and
      numerous rip currents.
    - Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
      Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in
      unprotected anchorages.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in New Orleans la around 5 am CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


111 am CDT Sat may 26 2018

This product covers southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi

**tropical storm and storm surge watches in effect for portions of
southeast Louisiana and coastal mississippi**

New information
---------------

* changes to watches and warnings:
    - none

* current watches and warnings:
    - a storm surge watch and tropical storm watch are in effect for
      Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, lower Plaquemines, lower St.
      Bernard, Orleans, and upper St. Bernard
    - a tropical storm watch is in effect for Ascension, Livingston,
      lower Jefferson, southern Tangipahoa, St. Charles, St. James,
      St. John The Baptist, St. Tammany, upper Jefferson, and upper
      Plaquemines

* storm information:
    - about 800 miles south-southeast of New Orleans la or about 810
      miles south-southeast of Gulfport MS
    - 19.1n 85.7w
    - storm intensity 40 mph
    - movement east or 90 degrees at 4 mph

Situation overview
------------------

* overview... at 100 am CDT, sub-Tropical Storm Alberto was located
over the northwestern Caribbean Sea and was moving slowly east
near 4 mph. The system is expected to begin moving north later
today with a faster motion to the north expected Saturday night
and Sunday. Tropical impacts should begin to be felt across
southeast Louisiana and southern Mississippi by late
Sunday and Sunday night and persist through Tuesday morning. The
primary impact will be heavy rainfall that could produce inland
flooding. Secondary impacts will be storm surge, tornadoes, and
tropical storm force winds.

Potential impacts
-----------------

* flooding rain:
prepare for locally hazardous rainfall flooding having possible
limited impacts across portions of the Mississippi coast and
extreme southeast Louisiana and south Mississippi. Potential
impacts include:
    - localized rainfall flooding may prompt a few evacuations.
    - Rivers and tributaries may quickly rise with swifter currents.
      Small streams, creeks, canals, and ditches may become swollen
      and overflow in spots.
    - Flood waters can enter a few structures, especially in usually
      vulnerable spots. A few places where rapid ponding of water
      occurs at underpasses, low-lying spots, and poor drainage
      areas. Several storm drains and retention ponds become
      near-full and begin to overflow. Some brief Road and bridge
      closures.

* Wind:
prepare for dangerous wind having possible significant impacts across
extreme southeast Louisiana and coastal Mississippi. Potential impacts
include:
    - some damage to roofing and siding materials, along with damage
      to porches, awnings, carports, and sheds. A few buildings
      experiencing window, door, and garage door failures. Mobile
      homes damaged, especially if unanchored. Unsecured lightweight
      objects become dangerous projectiles.
    - Several large trees snapped or uprooted, but with greater
      numbers in places where trees are shallow rooted. Several
      fences and roadway signs blown over.
    - Some roads impassable from large debris, and more within urban
      or heavily wooded places. A few bridges, causeways, and access
      routes impassable.
    - Scattered power and communications outages, but more prevalent
      in areas with above ground lines.

* Surge:
prepare for life-threatening surge having possible significant
impacts across the immediate coast of Mississippi and also
for east facing shores outside of the hurricane protection system
in far southeast Louisiana. Potential impacts in
this area include:
    - areas of inundation with storm surge flooding accentuated by
      waves. Damage to several buildings, mainly near the coast.
    - Sections of near-shore escape routes and secondary roads become
      weakened or washed out, especially in usually vulnerable low
      spots.
    - Major beach erosion with heavy surf breaching dunes. Strong and
      numerous rip currents.
    - Moderate damage to marinas, docks, boardwalks, and piers.
      Several small craft broken away from moorings, especially in
      unprotected anchorages.

Precautionary/preparedness actions
----------------------------------

* additional sources of information:
- for information on appropriate preparations see ready.Gov
- for information on creating an emergency plan see getagameplan.Org
- for additional disaster preparedness information see Redcross.Org

Next update
-----------

The next local statement will be issued by the National Weather
Service in New Orleans la around 5 am CDT, or sooner if conditions
warrant.


Flash Flood Watch
Issued: 5:06 AM CDT May. 26, 2018 – National Weather Service

... Flash Flood Watch in effect through Tuesday evening...

The National Weather Service in New Orleans has expanded the

* Flash Flood Watch to include portions of southeast Louisiana
and southern Mississippi, including the following areas, in
southeast Louisiana, northern Tangipahoa, St. Helena, and
Washington. In southern Mississippi, Pearl River, Pike, and
Walthall.

* Through Tuesday evening

* widespread 2 to 4 inches of rainfall likely in swaths along lake
and sea breeze boundaries. Some locally higher amounts
possible. Rain rates 2 to 3 inches per hour at times.

* Potential impacts of flooding include flooding of streets and
low lying areas. Increased water levels on area rivers and
streams. High rain rates may briefly overwhelm pumping
capacities until rates diminish.

Precautionary/preparedness actions...

A Flash Flood Watch means that conditions may develop that lead
to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation.

Additional flash flood watches may be extended in area and time
at a later time throughout the weekend as the situation unfolds.

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action
should flash flood warnings be issued.