Angela's Blog

Friday's temperature records

By: angelafritz, 05:03 PM GMT die 22o July, anno 2011

Record breaking temperatures from some select cities. I will update this blog as new records are set.
(Updated at 1:30pm PDT, 4:30pm EDT)


All-Time High Temperature

Newark, NJ
A record high temperature of 108 degrees was set at Newark NJ today. This breaks the old record of 101 set in 1957 and the all time record of 105 set on August 9, 2001. Records began at newwark NJ in 1931.

Bridgeport, CT
A record high temperature of 103 degrees was tied at Bridgeport CT today. This ties the old record of 103 set in 1957. This is also the all time high for Bridgeport.

Hartford, CT
At 406 PM the temperature reached 103 degrees at Bradley International Airport. This sets a new record high temperature for todays date for Hartford CT. The previous record was 101 degrees in 1926. The temperature of 103 degrees also sets an all time record high temperature for Hartford. The previous record of 102 degrees was set on multiple dates of July 6 2010...August 9 of 2001 and July 3 of 1996.

Washington Dulles, DC
A new record daily maximum temperature of 105 degrees was set at Washington Dulles DC on Friday. This breaks the old record of 98 set on this day in 1998. This breaks the old all time record max of 104F set twice...on July 16 1988 and again on August 20 1983.


Daily High Temperature

Central Park, NY
A record high temperature of 104 degrees was set at Central Park NY today. This breaks the old record of 101 set in 1957.

Islip, NY
A record high temperature of 100 degrees was set at Islip NY today. This breaks the old record of 96 set in 1998.

JFK International Airport, NY
A record high temperature of 103 degrees was set at JFK today. This breaks the old record of 98 set in 1998.

Baltimore, MD
A new record daily maximum temperature of 106 degrees was set at Baltimore MD on Friday. This breaks the old record of 101 set in 1957.

Atlantic City, NJ
A record high temperature of 104 degrees was set at the Atlantic City Airport at 200 PM today. This breaks the previous record for this date of 98 degrees set in 1998.

Trenton, NJ
A record high temperature of 105 degrees was set at the Trenton Mercer Airport at 200 PM today. This breaks the previous record for this date of 101 degrees in 1926.

Philadelphia, PA
A record high temperature of 102 degrees was set at the Philadelphia International Airport at 300 PM today. This breaks the previous record for this date of 100 degrees last set in 1957.

Georgetown, DE
A record high temperature of 103 degrees was set at the Georgetown Airport at 300pm today. This breaks the previous record for this date of 101 degrees set in 1977.

Boston, MA
The temperature reached 103 degrees at 3:52pm at Boston's Logan International Airport. This ties the record high temperature for this date originally set in 1926.

La Guardia, NY
A record high temperature of 103 degrees was set at La Guardia NY today. This breaks the old record of 101 set in 1957.

Portland, ME
The 100 degrees today broke the old record for July 22nd of 94 degrees set in 1994. It also broke the record for the month of July which was 99 degrees set on July 21, 1977.

Here's the full statement from Portland, Maine:

RECORD EVENT REPORT
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE GRAY ME
500 PM EDT FRI JULY 22 2011

...RECORD HEAT IN PORTLAND MAINE...

THE PORTLAND JETPORT REACHED THE 100 DEGREE MARK TODAY (AT 2:59 PM)
...SETTING RECORDS FOR THE DATE AND THE MONTH. THIS WAS THE FIRST
TIME PORTLAND HAS HIT THE CENTURY MARK IN OVER 35 YEARS, ONLY THE
4TH TIME EVER AT THE JETPORT AND THE FIRST TIME IT HAS DONE SO IN
THE MONTH OF JULY.

THE LAST TIME PORTLAND SAW 100 DEGREES WAS ON AUGUST 2, 1975 WHEN
THE MERCURY SOARED TO 103 DEGREES...THE ALL TIME HIGH FOR PORTLAND.

THE 100 DEGREES TODAY BROKE THE OLD RECORD FOR JULY 22ND OF 94
DEGREES SET IN 1994. IT ALSO BROKE THE RECORD FOR THE MONTH OF JULY
WHICH WAS 99 DEGREES SET ON JULY 21, 1977.

HERE IS A LIST OF THE WARMEST TEMPERATURES EVER RECORDED IN PORTLAND
AT THE JETPORT...

RANK TEMPERATURE DATE
1 103 DEGREES AUGUST 2, 1975
2 100 DEGREES JULY 22, 2011 <===
3 100 DEGREES AUGUST 26, 1948
4 100 DEGREES AUGUST 27, 1948
5 99 DEGREES JULY 21, 1977
6 99 DEGREES AUGUST 11, 1944
7 99 DEGREES AUGUST 12, 1944
8 99 DEGREES AUGUST 13, 1977
9 98 DEGREES 7 TIMES...MOST RECENTLY ON JULY 10, 1993

Heat Wave Extreme Weather

Updated: 02:28 AM GMT die 23o July, anno 2011

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Friday's potential record temperatures

By: angelafritz, 08:42 PM GMT die 21o July, anno 2011

Sick of the heat yet? Well, hunker down. The worst is expected on Friday for the East Coast and the Mid-Atlantic, where heat index values could exceed 115°F.

The following lists some of the cities that are forecast to come within 5° of their all-time records.

Record High Maximum Temperature

Boston, Mass.—100°F (forecast) 104°F (record, 1911)

Newark, N.J.—102°F (forecast) 105°F (record, 1966)

Washington D.C.—103°F (forecast) 106°F (record, 1930)

Dulles Airport, Va.—103°F (forecast) 104°F (record, 1988)

Central Park, N.Y.—102°F (forecast) 106°F (record, 1936)

Providence, R.I.—100°F (forecast) 104°F (record, 1975)

Record High Minimum Temperature

Baltimore, Md.—80°F (forecast) 83°F (record, 1925)

Washington D.C.—82°F (forecast) 84°F (record, 1983)

Central Park, N.Y.—81°F (forecast) 84°F (record, 1908)

Norfolk, Va.—80°F (forecast) 84°F (record, 1942)

Philadelphia, Pa.—80°F (forecast) 83°F (record, 2010)

Richmond, Va.—78°F (forecast) 81°F (record, 2011)


Source: Hydrometeorological Prediction Center

Heat Wave Extreme Weather

Updated: 02:22 AM GMT die 22o July, anno 2011

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U.S. heat wave continues, shifts east

By: angelafritz, 04:05 PM GMT die 20o July, anno 2011

By Dr. Jeff Masters

Another day of dangerous heat in the Midwest
The dangerous Central U.S. heat wave of July 2011 will continue to bring another day of exceptionally humid heat to the Midwest today, and will also begin bringing temperatures in the mid-90s with high humidity to much of the mid-Atlantic and New England. The heat index--how hot the air feels when factoring in both the temperature and the humidity--exceeded 100°F in sixteen states in the center of the country on Tuesday, with the dangerous heat extending from Texas northwards to North Dakota, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. At least thirteen deaths are being blamed on the heat in the Midwest. The heat index hit a torrid 129°F at Newton, Iowa on Tuesday, and a heat index in excess of 120° was recorded at several locations in North Dakota, Iowa, Illinois, and Minnesota.

Heat wave headed to the Eastern U.S.
The extreme heat will shift slowly eastwards this week, peaking in Chicago today, Detroit and Pittsburgh on Thursday, and New York City and the mid-Atlantic states on Friday. The forecast high of 103° in Washington D.C. for Friday is just 3° below the hottest temperature ever recorded in the city, 106°. This will no doubt stimulate some predictable quotes on global warming. The heat will remain in place over the mid-Atlantic states through Sunday, then ease on Monday when a cold front is expected to pass through. Wunderground's climate change blogger Dr. Ricky Rood has some good insights on the current heat wave in his latest post.

Predicted maximum heat index for Friday, July 22, 2011. Portions of 35 states are predicted to have a heat index in excess of 100°, with a heat index in excess of 115° expected over large portions of Virginia, Maryland, and Delaware. Image credit: NOAA.

Read full blog post

Heat Wave Extreme Weather

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Central U.S. continues to bake in heat wave

By: angelafritz, 06:15 PM GMT die 18o July, anno 2011

Heat continues to build across the Central U.S., where excessive heat warnings, watches, and advisories have been issued in 17 states. A strong, large ridge of high pressure, record drought in the south, and above average soil moisture in the Upper Midwest are to blame for this week's blistering heat. These events have combined to produce some extreme heat indices so far.

Selected heat index values from Sunday:

• 126°F in Newton, Iowa
• 125°F in Knoxville, Iowa
• 120°F in Mitchell, South Dakota
• 119°F in Madison, Minnesota
• 116°F in York, Nebraska
• 115°F in Bismarck, North Dakota
• 114°F in Volk/Camp Douglas, Wisconsin
• 112°F in Shawnee, Oklahoma
• 110°F in Topeka, Kansas

A The heat will stretch toward the East Coast by the end of the week, with a possible reprieve for the Upper Midwest in the forecast. However, high temperatures in the 90s are expected to remain in place through next weekend. Further south in Kansas and Oklahoma, high temperatures won't get below 100°F through Sunday.

According to the National Weather Service, extreme heat is typically the number one weather-related killer in the United States. Forecasters and public health officials alike are asking people to take precautions over the next week. Drink more water than you usually would, especially if you exercise or work outdoors. Avoid alcohol. Stay inside in air-conditioned buildings, and check on family and neighbors. Don't run the air conditioning too cool as this could lead to widespread power outages if everyone does the same. The demand on power plants will already be exceptionally high.

Local Forecasts:

Dallas, Texas
Amarillo, Texas
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Kansas City, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
Omaha, Nebraska
Des Moines, Iowa
Rapid City, South Dakota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Fargo, North Dakota

You can find your local forecast by entering your city or zip code in the search bar at the top of the page.


Current U.S. Heat Index


This colored contour map shows current heat index. Heat index is the apparent temperature considering both the temperature and relative humidity. The key below the image shows the corresponding heat index for each color.



Current U.S. Temperature


This colored contour map shows current temperatures. The key below the image shows the corresponding temperature value for each color.



Current U.S. Relative Humidity


This colored contour map shows current relative humidity. Relative humidity is the ratio of water vapor contained in the air to the maximum amount of water vapor that can be contained in the air at the current temperature. The key below the image shows the corresponding relative humidity for each color.

Heat Wave Extreme Weather

Updated: 07:15 PM GMT die 18o July, anno 2011

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Heat wave builds across Central U.S.

By: angelafritz, 10:44 PM GMT die 16o July, anno 2011

Extreme heat is building across the Central U.S., and it doesn't look like it will let up for the region until Thursday or Friday. Excessive heat warnings, heat advisories, and excessive heat watches blanket the central U.S. from Texas north to Minnesota.

Temperatures will top 100°F in some locations, and heat indices could surpass 115°F. Expect that overnight lows might not get below 80°F—values that are 15 to 20 degrees above normal for much of the Upper Midwest. The heat is expected to remain in place for most of the week, but will begin to shift eastward by Thursday or Friday.

A strong ridge of high pressure is in place across most of the U.S., allowing high temperatures to build. Combine that ridge with the prolonged, intense drought across the southern tier, and you have a recipe for an extreme July heat wave.

In the Upper Midwest, enough moisture will be present to make the heat unbearable. The "heat index" is often referred to as the "feels-like" temperature—how hot it feels to your skin. When temperatures soar, humidity can exacerbate the heat. The Midwest has had just enough rain in the past couple of weeks to make the air more humid than it is down south, which is why the heat index will be so high in this region. The air moisture is also caused by agriculture. We often see high humidity where lots of corn is grown, especially Iowa.

Forecasters and public health officials alike are asking people to take precautions over the next week. Drink more water than you usually would, especially if you exercise or work outdoors. Avoid alcohol. Stay inside in air-conditioned buildings, and check on family and neighbors. Don't run the air conditioning too cool as this could lead to widespread power outages if everyone does the same. The demand on power plants will already be exceptionally high.

Local Forecasts:

Dallas, Texas
Amarillo, Texas
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Kansas City, Missouri
St. Louis, Missouri
Omaha, Nebraska
Des Moines, Iowa
Rapid City, South Dakota
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Fargo, North Dakota

You can find your own local forecast by entering your city or zip code in the search bar at the top of the page.




Current U.S. Heat Index


This colored contour map shows current heat index. Heat index is the apparent temperature considering both the temperature and relative humidity. The key below the image shows the corresponding heat index for each color.



Current U.S. Temperature


This colored contour map shows current temperatures. The key below the image shows the corresponding temperature value for each color.



Current U.S. Relative Humidity


This colored contour map shows current relative humidity. Relative humidity is the ratio of water vapor contained in the air to the maximum amount of water vapor that can be contained in the air at the current temperature. The key below the image shows the corresponding relative humidity for each color.

Heat Wave Extreme Weather

Updated: 10:59 PM GMT die 16o July, anno 2011

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Climate summary for June 2011: heat, drought, and wildfires

By: angelafritz, 10:19 PM GMT die 14o July, anno 2011

The NCDC climate summary for June 2011 is out. Let's take a look....

Global

• June 2011 was the globe's 7th warmest June on record
• Land temperatures were the 4th warmest on record for the month of June
• Arctic sea ice was 9.44% below the 1979-2000 average, which ranks as the second smallest June Arctic sea ice extent on record
• Temperatures in the lower stratosphere were at their coldest levels on record, which is the second month in a row of record cold in the stratosphere


June 2011 selected climate anomalies and events map from NCDC. Click for the full version.

United States

• The average U.S. temperature was 1.4°F above normal
• 4,000 daily record high temperatures were tied or broken in the U.S., 159 of which were hottest for the month of June, and 42 were all-time high temperature records
• 63% of the Southeast was in moderate to exceptional drought by the end of June, according to the U.S. Drought Monitor
• Lubbock and Midland, Texas both experienced their hottest month of all time; the state of Texas set a new record for hottest June
• The year-to-date acreage burned is approximately 4.8 million acres, which is the most ever recorded for the period January to June, and more than twice the decadal average


U.S. Drought Monitor for the week ending in June 28, 2011. Click for a larger version.

Climate

Updated: 10:27 PM GMT die 14o July, anno 2011

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This week's heatwave: cause, effects, more to come?

By: angelafritz, 11:52 PM GMT die 13o July, anno 2011

The heat in the central and eastern U.S. has finally begun to subside with a (relatively weak) cold front pushing south. Yesterday, 24 states were under some kind of heat advisory. Heat indices (which combines temperature and humidity, and is sometimes described as "feels like" temperature) were pushing 120°F this week. Today, only a handful of advisory areas are left, but the parent ridge for this event is still there, and global models aren't suggesting it's going to move out any time soon. It looks like the heat is going to build back up in the northern states and stay parked in the southern states. We might be looking at another episode of extreme heat next week, particularly in the upper Midwest.


Heat advisories (in pink) as of 7:30 ET on Wednesday, July 13, 2011. Image taken from Wundermap.

The Christian Science Monitor called today to ask about the heat wave, whether it was normal, and what kind of effects an event like this has (CSM article: "Heat wave: Four things that will rise with temperature")

Yes, this heat wave can be described as normal. We often see heat waves that last a few days during the summer months. It's July, and it's expected. Although, as I remember all too well from living in the southeast U.S., when you're the one in the heat wave, you can't help but feel like it's totally bizarre and why isn't this heat ending already?! What is abnormal is when we see repeated or extended heatwaves throughout the summer and into the fall, like we saw in 2010. Jeff wrote a great blog on 2010's extreme weather events, and if you haven't read it already I recommend it. The deadliest heat wave in human history struck Moscow last year. Their all-time high record was tied or broken five times in two weeks. That's extreme. But it's also not totally unexpected—2010 tied 2005 for the warmest year on record. 2011 is shaping up to be a pretty extreme year as well (e.g. tornadoes, floods, droughts, wildfires...), so don't be completely surprised if we see quite a few heat waves this summer.

When I read that they wanted to ask me about the effects of the heat wave, the first thing that came to mind (obviously) were health impacts. Heat waves are incredibly taxing on the elderly and people with asthma. Low temperatures have only been getting down to the lower 80s (F) in some areas, and air quality is poor. But an effect we don't immediately think of is more long-term. We're using much more energy during extreme weather events, which not only pumps up our utility bills, but also pumps more and more carbon and particulate matter into the atmosphere, which only exacerbates the problem (albeit on different time scales). Studies have been done to understand our behavior during heat waves and bad air quality, and while a lot of people stay home and turn on the A/C, many, many people get in their cars and drive to the mall or the movie theater, or some other place where they don't have to foot the energy bill.

In the meantime, we're drowning in fog in San Francisco, so I don't know who has it worse. Although we do have one thing in common with the southeast today: extreme humidity. You can tell the air is saturated when it's 60°F and you can see your breath.

Heat Wave Climate Change Extreme Weather

Updated: 11:40 AM GMT die 14o July, anno 2011

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About angelafritz

Atmospheric Scientist here at Weather Underground, with serious nerd love for tropical cyclones and climate change. Twitter: @WunderAngela

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